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Monster Cropping Cannabis: Everything You Need To Know

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Monster Cropping Cannabis: Everything You Need To Know

Marijuana plants ready for monster cropping

Do you grow your own cannabis? Do you want to experience huge yields and get the most out of your favorite strain? Then, boy, do we have a treat for you! It’s called monster cropping.

In this article, the cannabis experts at Honest Marijuana tell you everything you need to know about this unique growing method.

Armed with this knowledge, you can fill up your grow space with plenty of pot plants just waiting to be harvested.

A Bit About Biology

Close-up of a marijuana plant

With many plants — cannabis included — it’s possible for you, the grower, to cut off a healthy, green branch, replant it, and nurture it until it grows on its own.

Scientists call this practice cloning because you essentially create an exact copy of the mother plant. Both mother and daughter have identical genes.

Cloning is different than growing a plant from seed because the seed contains slightly different genes than the plant from which it came. So if you take a seed from one plant, put it in the ground, and grow it to maturity, the new plant will be different from the original. The new plant may look different (or it may not), but the real change occurs at the genetic level.

With cloning, on the other hand, you can compare the two separate plants down to the cellular level and not see any difference.

Keep this idea of cloning in mind as we start to talk about monster cropping.

What Is Monster Cropping?

Marijuana leaves from monster cropping

Monster cropping is the process of cutting off a piece of a cannabis plant in its flowering stage, replanting it, and nurturing it until it grows on its own.

This definition sounds very similar — if not identical — to the definition for cloning mentioned above. That’s because monster cropping, at its most basic, is just creating clones of the mother plant.

So why do it? And why do ganja growers call it monster cropping instead of cloning?

We can answer both of those questions by examining the name itself.

What’s In A Name?

Monster

The formal definition of the word monster is:

An imaginary creature that is typically large, ugly, and frightening.

Over the years, that definition has evolved slightly into:

A thing or animal that is excessively or dauntingly large.

With the exception of the word “frightening” in the first definition, both pretty much describe the clones you get from the mother plant: large and ugly.

Once the clones take root, they can grow to be extremely large…possibly even larger than the mother plant.

The clones will be ugly in many ways. You can expect single-finger leaves and possibly even some mutations.

Don’t fret. That’s a normal response to all the stress you inflicted on the poor little cutting. If you nurture it correctly, the plant will get over it in no time.

Cropping

Younger, more tech-savvy readers may only be familiar with the word “crop” as it relates to cutting a picture down to a smaller size. That’s not what we’re talking about here.

In this case, we’re talking about a much older definition: a cultivated plant.

In the agricultural sense, “crop” also implies a large number of said cultivated plants. So you could have a corn crop, a wheat crop, and, yes, a cannabis crop.

Taking it a step further, then, “cropping” is an informal word for growing a group of plants together. It’s not used very much anywhere other than the cannabis community, but you know how much we stoners like to invent new words!

Putting It All Together

We’ve talked about “monster” and we’ve talked about “cropping” separately, so let’s put them together and see what we get.

Big clones of the original plus an expansive group of plants: that’s monster cropping in a nutshell.

Dissecting the name clues you in to what it is exactly, but it also gives you an idea of why you would want to do it — monster yields.

Why Monster Cropping Works

Small baggie with cannabis plant matter inside

Why does monster cropping work? In a word, stress.

Stress rejuvenates cannabis and triggers the development of desired traits, including:

  • Vigorous growth of leaves, branches, nodes, and bud sites (the monster part of the equation)
  • Higher levels of THC

Yes, you read that right. Monster cropping produces higher levels of THC.

In a growing pot plant, cannabinoids act as a defense mechanism against predators (i.e., animals that eat the plant). So when you do what those predators do — remove pieces of the original plant — you cause both the mother plant and the cut piece to go into defense mode.

In the wild, that means releasing more THC to deter future attacks. Or, in the case of monster cropping, it means high-quality, high-THC weed.

How To Monster Crop

Supplies:

  • Razorblade, scalpel, or sharp scissors
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Glass of water (properly pH-balanced if possible) (option #1)
  • Plastic bag (option #1)
  • Rooting compound gel or powder (option #2)
  • Rooting cube (option #2)
  • Long-term growing medium
  • Grow lights

Monster Crop Option #1:

  1. At about three weeks into the flowering stage — 28 days into the 12/12 bloom cycle (that’s 12 hours of light, 12 hours of dark) — choose your best female plant.
  2. Sterilize your cutting tool with rubbing alcohol.
  3. Select a branch low on the plant with two or three nodes (avoid woody branches).
  4. Find a spot about ¼ of an inch below a node.
  5. Cut into the branch at a 45-degree angle below the node.
  6. Place the cutting in a cup of water so that the liquid covers at least an inch of the stem.
  7. Cover the cup with a plastic bag to retain moisture (make sure the bag isn’t airtight).
  8. Change the water every three days.
  9. Keep an eye out for white bumps on the stem below the waterline.
  10. Transplant the clone into the long-term growing medium when the roots are at least one inch long. Some growers wait until the roots are six inches long. This takes more time but doesn’t shock the plant as much when you transport the new growth to its final growing space. If you don’t want to wait that long but you still want a modicum of shock prevention, try transplanting when the roots are three inches long.
  11. Nurture the clones back to the vegetative state by exposing the new growth to the same light schedule you’d use for a regular plant in the vegetative state (e.g., 18/6, 20/4, or even 24/0).
  12. Maintain this re-veg process until the clones branch profusely and their leaves return to normal growth and appearance (about 30 days from taking the cuttings).
  13. Continue growing the clones as you would a regular pot plant from seed.

Monster Crop Option #2:

  1. At about three weeks into the flowering stage — 28 days into the 12/12 bloom cycle (that’s 12 hours of light, 12 hours of dark) — choose your best female plant.
  2. Sterilize your cutting tool with rubbing alcohol.
  3. Select a branch low on the plant with two or three nodes (avoid woody branches).
  4. Find a spot about ¼ of an inch below a node.
  5. Cut into the branch at a 45-degree angle below the node.
  6. Remove the bottom leaves from the cutting.
  7. Dip the stem in root compound.
  8. Poke a hole in the rooting cube with a pencil.
  9. Place the clone in the rooting cube.
  10. Keep the rooting cube moist. If you’re using a plastic tray, maintain about ¼-inch of water at the bottom.
  11. After a few weeks, you will notice roots pushing through the bottom of the rooting cube.
  12. Transplant everything (rooting cube and all) into the long-term growing medium.
  13. Nurture the clones back to the vegetative state by exposing the new growth to the same light schedule you’d use for a regular plant in the vegetative state (e.g., 18/6, 20/4, or even 24/0).
  14. Maintain this re-veg process until the clones branch profusely and their leaves return to normal growth and appearance (about 30 days from taking the cuttings).
  15. Continue growing the clones as you would a regular pot plant from seed.

Should You Try Monster Cropping?

Marijuana plant that is part of a monster crop

If you’re familiar with growing your own weed, you should absolutely try monster cropping.

The process does require a bit of advanced knowledge in order to be successful, but you really don’t lose much in the way of your original plant when you try to nurture a clone. So there’s little to no downside to experimenting with your first monster crop.

Restarting a clone or two does add time to the grow cycle, but the results are well worth the wait and the effort.

If you’ve got a plant that’s flowering well in your grow environment, nip off a branch from the bottom and create your own clone. You’ll get a new, healthy plant and double your original yield. And there’s nothing better than more bud for your buck.

For more information on all things cannabis and to check out our 100-percent all-natural marijuana products, visit HonestMarijuana.com today.

The post Monster Cropping Cannabis: Everything You Need To Know appeared first on Honest Marijuana.

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